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  • I have recently been having a go at some vinyl cutting. Hack Oldham has a Mutoh cutter. So, what better thing to do than cut some stickers for members to stick on their lap

  • So, we finally have the laser cutter up and running at Hack Oldham, this means I can make a start on my long to-do list of things to make. This began with a pencil box for

  • Sometimes we get thrown a curve ball during Digital Drop In.

  • We are proud to announce that we have recently been awarded the Action Together – Quality in Action Award. Action Together are a local organisation that supports comm

  • To finish my router I needed to make the Z axis. Here you can see the linear bearings and the ball nut mount on top, with the Kress router mount below. I had already ordere

  • I have been continuing work on my DIY CNC router this week by starting on the Y axis. This moves along the linear rails at the top and bottom of the Y gantry: The Y axis ne

  • Oldham Economy and Skills Partnership – A Digital Perspective When our new mayor, Andy Burnham, held his digital summit back in July, I was thrilled to see my digital colle

  • I sometimes have the need to make many surface mount printed circuit boards. Typically these take me about 30 minutes per board to make manually with a soldering iron.  I h

  • Hopefully you’ve seen the digital signage in the HackSpace window. I hope you agree, it looks quite good. All for under £10 (initially) plus some bits we had lying around.

I've found some more time to progress my computer controlled CNC router and assembled the stepper motor controller. The router has 3 axes (x,y,z) and each is moved by a stepper motor driving a ball screw. This amplifies the thrust of the motor substantially, allowing the...

Ok, let’s be honest, it’s NOT a black hole generator, but it does generate what look like holes in walls and tables that are very black. It’s actually an Infinity Mirror (not an Infinity Gauntlet, that’s from Marvel Comics). Anyway, here’s how I built it.
At Hack Oldham we’re always happy to have a go at unusual projects, particularly when they benefit other community groups. So when Oldham Theatre Workshop asked us to make a bicycle rickshaw used in one of their street theatre productions look spectacular, we jumped at the chance.
Want to do a quick hack? It might be a little more than 10 minutes, but not a whole lot. 10 Minute Hacks are simple, quick and easy. You should be able to build one with the sort of tools a hardware hacker is likely to have lying around or can get access to at a Hack Space and you should be able to buy the bits locally without resorting to the web (Craft Shops, Maplin, DIY stores, that sort of thing).

On Saturday the 30th of April we had the pleasure of a visit from Mitch Altman, and Jimmy Rodgers to the space, where Mitch delivered is Soldering is Easy workshop to a crown of both hackspace members and first time visitors. [caption id="attachment_4684" align="alignright" width="300"] Mitch and...

The robots are coming to Oldham, our plan is to operate a series of robotic tournaments to see who can create the best robot, each of the challenges below will have its own league table in addition to an overall league table. Challenges include. Maze navigation ...

That's a confusing title. What's a BBC micro:bit? Why are people from HackOldham being referred to as experts by otherwise responsible adults? Is STEMnet that thing from Terminator? What's a museum? All, and more, shall be revealed.

With the design finalised, and cash save up I spent £75 on the X bed for my CNC router. This  is a 15mm thick plate of aluminium that is 350mm x 600mm square. I needed to drill holes to fit the linear bearings that make up...

About 2 years ago, I decided that I'd like to try my hand at CNC routing. There are loads of Chinese made routers available on Ebay, but I wanted something a bit more capable. e.g. Able to machine aluminium. I started my design using the excellent PTC Creo...

You can read the first part of this blog here, and the second part here. Research (or mucking about with stuff) The first job was to buy a Pi screen and fingerprint scanner. I already had a Pi kicking around looking bored. A quick session on the interweb saw me securing a screen from Pimoroni and GT-511C3 finger print scanner from Proto-Pic. The Finger Print Scanner is ideal. It is a self-contained unit that stores the fingerprint templates locally, all you need to do is ask it for the unique ID of the finger print on the scanner. This can then be cross referenced to a person. It connects via a serial connection (0-3.3V rather than 0-12V of standard RS-232) which is ideal for connecting to a Pi or Arduino UART. There was a cheaper version but that could only store 20 fingerprints, this model can store 200, which is more than we should ever need. The only problem was there were none in stock, but that was OK because Proto-Pic said they could get more stock within a week.